Prestigious Historic Clock Exhibition Heads To London

Two private clock collectors have collaborated to stage an outstanding exhibition of early English clocks at the prestigious venue of Bonhams, New Bond Street, London in September.

The exhibition, called Innovation & Collaboration will also feature third party loans, including contributions from the Science Museum, the Clockmakers’ Company and the Collection of the 5th Lord Harris from Belmont House, amongst others.

However, given that the majority of clocks are privately owned, the specimens on display are very rarely in the public eye. Indeed, what makes the exhibition particularly exciting is that many of the clocks are being displayed together, almost certainly for the first time.

A substantial number of the clocks were either Royal commissions or part of historic private collections within both stately and luxury homes of the period. The exhibition’s main objective is to share a passion for these exquisite clocks and to ignite a new public interest.

Running from Monday September 3 to Friday September 14, the exhibition provides a fascinating and unique insight into the innovation and collaboration of the pioneering clockmakers from 1600 to 1726. Clearly a period of significant historical importance, the work of Edward East, Thomas Tompion plus the clockmaking families Fromanteel and Knibb, is explored in detail, with over 100 longcase and table clocks on display.

Dates: Monday September 3 – Friday September 14 2018
Times: Weekdays 9:30 AM to 4:30 PM, Saturday and Sunday 11:00 AM to 3:00 PM.
Location: Bonhams, 101 New Bond Street, London, W1S 1SR

Admission: Free to enter. For further information please visit the website: http://clockexhibition.org.uk/ or see the Twitter up-dates https://twitter.com/ClockExhibition, Instagram up-dates https://www.instagram.com/clockexhibition/ or Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Clock-Exhibition-2134899423192633/.

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